It’s October, apples and pumpkins are everywhere, but it’s also the time for our favorite autumn treat.. Quince! The old orchard behind the house has some quince trees that have been planted by people long before us. They have been lovingly neglected since, survived and thrived, and now provide us with the sweetest end of harvest we could ask for.

Combine it with our fall honey and bone-in lamb or goat stew meat (the bones provide more flavor and nutrition), and be ready for a full on post harvest dinner mood.

Quince in hand with leaves on ground

 

Here’s what you’ll need:

 

2 tbsp of lard/tallow or olive oil

2 lbs of bone-in lamb/goat stew meat

2 onion, chopped

3/4 cloves of garlic, finely chopped

2 tsp ground cinnamon

1 tsp ground coriander

1 tsp ground turmeric

1 tsp ground cumin

½ tsp ground cloves

½ tsp saffron strands

1 tbsp of our fall honey

3 cups of bone broth

2 quinces, peeled, cored, chopped roughly

As always, we play around with what we have, so no need to make a supermarket run if you’re out of one of the spices.

 

How to cook it:

Preheat your oven at 325F. 

Brown the stew meat in a skillet over medium/high heat in the fat or oil. Meanwhile, chop the onions and slowly, slowly brown them in an oven safe pot (enamel or cast iron) in about 12 minutes. The add the garlic and cook until golden in about a minute, then add all the spices and honey and stir for another minute. 

Transfer the browned meat into the pot, and add a bit of the broth to the meat skillet. Scrape the browned pieces off while heating the broth, and add it to the large pot to not lose those flavors.

Lamb stew with quince in pot

Now add the rest of the broth and the chopped quince to the large pot. Bring to a simmer, cover with a lid and transfer it to the oven. Braise it for about 2.5 hrs. Then remove the lid, and cook for another 20 minutes.

Quince cut in half

If you prefer a thicker sauce, you may transfer the lamb and quince to a bowl, and cook the liquids over the fire until the desired thickness. Serve over rice, couscous or just in a bowl with some flatbread on the side.